News

Press Release: Dwight Raum, Veteran Healthcare Technology Leader From Johns Hopkins, Joins Quil as Chief Digital Officer to Scale Portfolio of Leading Care Engagement and Connected Home Platforms

PHILADELPHIA–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Quil, the company on a mission to help consumers organize and navigate their health lives in partnership with their providers, health plans and loved ones, today announced that Dwight Raum has been appointed as the company’s Chief Digital Officer. Raum brings decades of healthcare and technology transformation experience to the Quil leadership team and in his capacity as Chief Digital Officer will focus on accelerating the scalability and growth of the company’s digital care engagement and connected home platforms.

“I’m thrilled that Dwight is joining our team. Over the past 20 years he has led the digital transformation of one of the most prestigious health systems in the world. His unique expertise in leading technology adoption and transformation across health systems, health plans, patients and their families, will accelerate our continued growth” said Carina Edwards, Quil CEO. “We’ve proven that inspiring, personal, and empowering experiences lead to better outcomes, and we know that Dwight will bring new, innovative approaches to ensure our platforms support the unique, complex challenges of health systems and health consumers through our next stage of growth.”

Raum joins Quil after spending 20 years at Johns Hopkins Medicine, most recently serving as both Chief Technology Officer and Chief Information Officer, in addition to being Co-Director for Johns Hopkins Precision Medicine Digital Strategy. Raum also Co-founded and served as the Executive Director of the Technology Innovation Center at Johns Hopkins Medicine, which builds and deploys innovative clinical information systems across the institution. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Raum led the team responsible for designing new digital health and screening tools for Johns Hopkins Medicine.

“Quil offers the critical technology solutions that are elevating digital health and patient engagement in unprecedented ways,” said Raum. “I am excited to join Quil and bring my experience to a company that is changing the digital health market. The importance of reliable digital health tools that are trusted by patients and doctors is a critical component to each patient and caregiver journey and is growing in importance every day. It is an honor to join Quil to meet that challenge.”

Raum earned his B.S. in Management Science with a specialty in Production Operations Management from Virginia Tech.

About Quil

Quil, the joint venture between Independence Health Group (Independence) and Comcast, is the digital health engagement platform that offers personalized and interactive health journeys to consumers and their caregivers. Quil is committed to educating and engaging consumers about their health as we believe the impact means better outcomes at a lower cost. Quil serves patients, members, and their caregivers and is partnered with healthcare providers and health plans nationally. We are headquartered in Philadelphia, PA with additional offices in New York City. Connect with Quil now. Follow Quil on Twitter and on LinkedIn.

Communications Contact: Justyna Evlogiadis | Quil 

(E): jevlogiadis@quilhealth.com

Communications Contact: Donald Fantozzi | Sloane & Company

(P): 202-379-5902

(E): dfantozzi@sloanepr.com

Originally posted by Business Wire. View here.

Healthcare Leaders: The Importance of Embracing Patient Engagement

Press Release: pCare Ambulatory powered by Quil Advances Cross-Continuum Care Collaboration at Penn Presbyterian

New solution streamlines discharge home and reinforces post-op recovery for surgical patients

PHILADELPHIA — September 16, 2021 — pCare Ambulatory, the digital health and patient engagement solution jointly created by pCare and Quil, recently launched at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. pCare Ambulatory, powered by Quil Engage, works in concert with the pCare inpatient Interactive Patient Care System and has been configured to reimagine the post-operation recovery process to help patients recover with confidence.

Leveraging the open APIs at the core of pCare and Quil technology, patients have a seamless experience across devices and locations providing them with the information they need to transition successfully from hospitals back to their homes for their recovery. pCare Ambulatory guides patients to know their next best action with personalized videos, articles, check-ins and reminders for continued physical therapy exercises. More importantly, patients can also easily invite family and friends to support them, which has been proven to lead to better recovery outcomes1. Now patients can get a head start on their recovery process before discharge from the hospital. Patients who have used the platform pre-op, will automatically be shown recommended recovery videos on their recovery room TVs. Patients who are new to pCare Ambulatory will simply enter their mobile phone number on their recovery room TV and immediately will be invited to their personalized journey.

“As a comprehensive patient engagement solution, Quil supports and activates people along their health journey. Our solution has saved clinical teams time and improved clinical outcomes. At the same time, patients and their loved ones receive personalized guidance and reminders that are instrumental in improving patient experience and adherence, ultimately leading to lower readmissions and overall costs for our partnering health systems,” said Molly Doyle, Chief Product Officer at Quil. “Our companies share a passion for addressing the many challenges in care transitions, and we are excited to launch this offering with Penn Presbyterian.”

The jointly developed pCare and Quil solution draws upon the strengths of each company to empower patients to engage with their care plan through their televisions, computers or mobile devices, helping patients and caregivers make more informed decisions and navigate the complex healthcare landscape. The integration has also paved the way for a more proactive approach to engage patients as active participants in their care, which leads to improved patient experience, patient adherence, lower unnecessary readmissions and overall costs.

“Prior to the pandemic as value-based care was gaining traction, pCare made the strategic decision to help our hospital system clients engage with patients longitudinally via mobile and digital first solutions. We partnered with Quil to develop pCare Ambulatory to extend and complement our interactive patient care and rounding solutions,” Tim Vaughan, Chief Product Officer at pCare, said. “We are excited to see pCare Ambulatory launch at Penn Presbyterian.  Our joint offering is perfect for the emerging hybrid care paradigm and look forward to helping more patients, families and providers across all touchpoints.”

While Penn Presbyterian Medical Center is focused on delivering an improved discharge-to-home and recovery process for clinical staff and patients, pCare Ambulatory also focuses on helping patients prepare for their episodes of care, making this a complete cross-continuum care solution.  

Together, pCare and Quil look forward to continuing to reimagine ways to improve outcomes during care transitions for patients and clinicians everywhere[AS1] [SA2] .

To learn more about pCare  and Quil’s joint offering/partner solution, please visit the pCare website.[SA3] 

1Integrating Caregivers at Discharge Significantly Cuts Patient Readmissions, UPMC, 2017 

About Quil

Quil, the joint venture between Independence Health Group (Independence) and Comcast, is the digital health engagement platform that offers personalized and interactive health journeys to consumers and their caregivers. Quil is committed to educating and engaging consumers about their health as we believe the impact means better outcomes at a lower cost. Quil serves patients, members, and their caregivers and is partnered with healthcare providers and health plans nationally. We are headquartered in Philadelphia, PA with additional offices in New York City. Connect with Quil now. Follow Quil on Twitter and on LinkedIn.

Communications Contact: Susanna Arntz | Quil 

(P): 973-223-2153 

(E): sarntz@quilhealth.com 

About pCare™ 

pCare’s interactive patient experience solution helps healthcare providers engage, educate, and entertain patients across the care continuum. The pCare open platform integrates with existing EHR/EMR systems, patient portals, and mobile health applications to connect patients, families and caregivers. Recognized by KLAS as the quality leader in the interactive patient systems category for five consecutive years, pCare is the partner leading healthcare organizations trust to improve care quality, patient outcomes, and financial performance. Connect with pCare now. Follow pCare on Twitter @pCarebyTVRC and TVR Communications on LinkedIn.  

Communications Contact: Robert Abrahamson | pCare

(P): 267-614-5214

(E): rabrahamson@pcare.com

Originally posted by PR Newswire. View here.

Let’s Get Personal – How Healthcare Organizations Can Better Activate Patients in their Care

It’s been proven that an activated and engaged patient leads to better outcomes. So, why is it that healthcare systems have trouble activating patients in their care? It starts with making these solutions personal, to the patient, their family who supports them and to the healthcare providers who prescribe these solutions. This leap to bold transformation and personalization conflicts with the incremental, one-size-fits-all approaches we see today.

Why is it that people can find the time to binge watch six episodes of their favorite show, regularly engage on social media, or get lost in their TikTok For-You Page, but spend precious little time preparing for an upcoming surgical procedure? My thesis is that we in the healthcare industry don’t make the processes entertaining, fun or inspiring – and most importantly, we don’t make it personal. The issue often boils down to the industry’s imagination deficit and their one-size-fits-all approach for enterprise scale.

The Industry Imagination Deficit – A One-Size-Fits-All Approach

Analyzing what solutions new technologies have to offer can at times feel more approachable when a singular use-case is clearly delineated; it’s often easier to look at gaps or problems in a pre-existing system and look to a point-solution to plug in and address the issue for patients with that need. But there’s an imagination deficit in the industry, which manifests through this one-size-fits-all approach and creates a habit of tackling issues with tunnel-vision based on generalizations about a specific population of patients rather than focusing on the individual person. This generic information leaves the patients and their caregivers more confused and seeking information from alternative sources, and ultimately disconnected in their healthcare experiences.

Looking to an integrated platform solution that can improve operations organization-wide or address the various needs of as many different kinds of patients as possible is essential. Those of us who work to improve health literacy and patient engagement know full well that personalizing tools to each patient is key. Imagine a digital experience where your doctor welcomes you to your journey and shares a custom playlist for your health journey, broken down into bite-size pieces of information served up at the just right time, that link you to all the right tools you need to take the next best action.

We need to take this approach into our conversations with provider and payor organizations when integrating digital health tools into their services and systems as well. Maximum-impact transformation is best unlocked through collaboration. As new technology can get pigeon-holed as a point solution with some of the scope of its capabilities unrealized, communication and collaboration between new digital innovators on the scene and the provider and payor organizations they serve is the path forward to unlocking the universe of possibilities digital health tools have to offer.

How to Leverage Digital Health Tools for Transformative Care and Engagement

Point solutions that can be applied for a particular use-case can modernize processes and improve outcomes in a particular area but can leave a system out of synch without organization-wide integration capabilities. This can lead to a disjointed experience for patients and their families. Particularly exciting new technology is often applied narrowly – even when the technology could be employed for broader and truly transformative improvement of care.

Stakeholders throughout an organization should be looped in on innovation efforts to maximize efficacy of digital health tools. Managing Directors at a hospital system for example should have access to key insights on the kinds of tools that best activate their patient populations in their care. And on an individual patient level, MD’s need insights into patient care plan adherence, health improvements, and more importantly, any health declines so that they can intervene in a timely manner for maximum impact in quality of care and outcomes. When players organization-wide are involved in the process, direction for future investments in innovation become much more clear.

Scalability necessitates that stakeholders evaluate new digital healthcare solutions through a lens of what could be to unlock the full capabilities technology has to offer. Platform solutions that may build off the same technology as a point solution require forward-looking vision from all parties – developers, care providers, digital health leaders and payors – to create impact at scale.

In order to move towards the transformation in healthcare and patient engagement that our current technology does have the power to spur, we need to view interoperability and org-wide implementation as a critical when discussing deployment of these solutions. Leveraging technology like artificial intelligence and machine learning to transform care pathways into personalized, inspiring, engaging patient journeys that make patients active in their own care plans.

Organization leaders can work together to leverage these digital tools to meet patients where they are, gain an understanding of their digital and health literacy, and bring forward the best possible outcome, but this all starts with ongoing conversation between digital health innovators and the organizations and patients they serve to identify opportunities for maximum impact across systems.

Stakeholders must come together to take stock of the tools new digital health technology has to offer, and rather than incrementally incorporating digital tools that bring a one-size-fits-all experience to patients, ask “How can we transform the experience to keep patients and their families tuned in with their healthcare journey by providing guidance to their next best steps at exactly the right time for them?”

Originally posted on LinkedIn by Carina Edwards, Executive Officer at Quil. View here.

Can the collaborative spirit COVID-19 sparked improve health care affordability?

Featured Story

How Women in Technology are Changing Health Care Today and Tomorrow

Carina Edwards, CEO of Quil, spoke at a panel discussion of women CEO leaders changing the face of the digital health care industry, and how they are uniquely innovating for the future of how we operate in the path forward.

About The Event
The pace of change was forced to accelerate over the past year. IT leaders and business owners found themselves with unexpected challenges – supporting a remote workforce, solving for a new customer experience or addressing supply chain issues – and it was up to these leaders to adapt quickly for the good of their organization. Many entities that were constrained by legacy technologies found it difficult to pivot and change operations. This on demand panel discussion features women CEO leaders, from Quil Health, Opus Interactive and DataDx, who are revolutionizing digital health care.

The event is now viewable on-demand here.

Originally Posted by Portland Business Journal. View Here.

The New Normal: Digital Health in the Post-COVID World – Part 2: Physicians and Digital Health, the Road to Greater Adoption

Healthcare professionals and patients alike are relying on digital health tools in greater numbers than ever before. As the world is beginning to reopen, what happens next for digital health leaders and care providers now that more patients have experienced virtual care integrated into their experiences as a result of COVID-19?

Much like working remotely has eliminated long and costly commutes, physicians and patients have both experienced the upside of an accelerated transition to digital health. We examined the patient upsides in part 1 of this series – providers are also seeing improved healthcare outcomes and lower costs as a result of adopting digital tools. As leaders in digital health, it is up to us to prove these benefits are here to stay in a post-COVID world.

Physician adoption of digital health – the COVID acceleration

A lasting digital transformation requires that physicians trust and use digital healthcare tools as well as patients. The good news is even before the pandemic, physician adoption of digital tools was on the rise. If leaders in digital health can continue to prove to physicians that these online tools can both help their patients and streamline their workflows, physician adoption rates will only rise further.

Early studies have shown that the pandemic is spurring large-scale adoption of digital health tools across the industry. Digital health tracking tools saw the biggest growth in 2020, rising from 42% adoption rates in 2019 to 54% in 2020. These tools were around prior to the pandemic, but providers needed to implement their most innovative solutions to continue to provide the best care possible as resources were stretched during COVID. Now that the industry has seen the possibilities enabled by adopting digital health tools, for both patients and staff, implementation efforts continue to increase.

Many of Quil’s partnering organizations saw a notable jump in their populations’ interest in their own health and in activation on digital health tools throughout the pandemic. For example, Penn Medicine saw 78% of registered Quil users completing video content during the pandemic, compared to 44% before COVID. Seniors especially are keen to incorporate digital health into their plans; users aged 61 to 70 had the highest percent increase in log ins with a 13% increase in Quil logins during COVID.

This is good news not just for physicians, but all clinical staff from the front desk to the nurses. Health-literate and empowered patients means reduced hospital stay lengths, improved discharge-to-home rates, ultimately freeing up clinical staff to provide more efficient care.

Digital health leaders’ role in adoption

How will digital health leaders get more physicians and clinical staff on board? We must look beyond simply fitting digital health tools into medical staff’s workflows. We need to demonstrate the inherent value digital tools bring to their patients through better clinical results, and to clinical staff by streamlining care and giving them back precious minutes in their day. That means interoperability – easy, reliable connectivity between physician and consumer devices – is a must.

Notably many CIO’s have found themselves transitioning their focus from clinical automation to patient-centered engagement throughout the course of the past year’s industry-wide pivot to digital health. As CIOs become more invested in patient engagement than ever before, they can champion, influence and inspire care teams to use the tools that will both save them time and resources as well as create higher quality experiences for patients, ultimately improving health outcomes.

Providers adapted quickly in the face of the COVID pandemic to embrace digital tools to remotely care for patients and greatly accelerated innovation in healthcare as a result. Now as we embark into a post-COVID world, the value of digital health is more apparent than ever and desired by patients and doctors alike – leaders in digital health business must build on the past year’s successes.  

Originally posted on LinkedIn by Carina Edwards, Executive Officer at Quil. View here.

The New Normal: Digital Health in the Post-COVID World – Part 1: The Future of Digital Health for Consumers

In our increasingly online world, greater adoption in digital health has been a trend among consumers for several years. This past year poured rocket fuel on that trend across every demographic. We know it’s not just the kids glued to their phones either – seniors are becoming more comfortable using technology and caregivers are increasingly using online tools to inform healthcare decisions for their loved ones.

The data shows many patients are on board to continue the trend. Not only has the number of patients using telehealth and digital tracking tools jumped over 40% each in the past year, but almost 88% of patients want to continue using telehealth for non-urgent consultations. But, as digital health innovators, we know that telehealth is only one component of comprehensive virtual care.

Giving Consumers Control

The pandemic showed consumers that the incredible benefits of digital healthcare go far beyond a simple video call with a physician. Digital innovators are taking the telehealth trend one step further and engaging patients and caregivers even when they are not directly in front of a doctor.

One study found that 51% of patients failed to recall recommendations and treatments their physician gave unless prompted, which the authors attributed to lack of patient participation during the visit. This study highlights the absolute need for asynchronous learning opportunities for patients and caregivers. Instead of simply receiving information, digital health users become active learners and champions of their own health and the health of their loved ones. The combination of face-to-face telehealth plus the provision of healthcare information to patients at any time in between doctor’s visits can give consumers confidence and control.

We will always need doctors’ offices, but it’s up to digital health innovators to facilitate the right mix of in-person and virtual encounters, asynchronous virtual learning, and checking in. Now with greater adoption of digital health tools, patients are back in control with on-demand healthcare information.

Engaging Consumers

Streaming platforms like Amazon, Netflix, and Peacock have completely revolutionized the way we watch television and made the term “binge-watching” practically the same as just “watching” a show. Who hasn’t been excited for the next episode of New Amsterdam?

Streaming services make content engaging, easy to use, and constantly available, so binging comes naturally. Digital health leaders must learn from this model and make consuming and digesting health information just as easy and engaging. Healthcare organizations must be open to and excited about the idea of meeting people where they are.

We already know that delivering personalized healthcare information on consumers’ preferred devices results in happier and healthier patients.

Patients want to be engaged in their healthcare and seek content that provides them the tools to do so. Simply giving consumers the time and access to process and learn relevant healthcare information on their own in an engaging setting has led to incredible results.

What’s Next?

The healthcare IT industry is at a turning point. Despite all the challenges we faced during the pandemic, now is the time to prove digital health is not just for a quarantined world. Consumers want to rely on digital health now more than ever, for themselves and to help care for their loved ones. If digital health leaders don’t want their platforms to go the way of the laser disc, now is the time to meet this demand and provide engaging, accessible and relevant healthcare content.

Originally posted on LinkedIn by Carina Edwards, Executive Officer at Quil. View here.

Press Release: Parity.org Shares 2021 Best Companies for Women to Advance List

34 companies recognized for providing their workforce with supportive benefits, policies, and programs

NEW YORK, June 22, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Parity.org today announced the Best Companies for Women to Advance List 2021. Thirty-four companies made the list, including Adobe, Airbnb, Best Buy, The Clorox Company, Deutsche Bank, Nasdaq, PagerDuty, PepsiCo, and Ralph Lauren Corporation.

The Best Companies for Women to Advance List was established by Parity.org in 2020 to recognize organizations that have benefits, policies, and programs that are particularly beneficial for women to advance in the workplace.

“After a year that has erased all the corporate gains women made in the past several decades, there are still companies that are making progress to support women’s advancement at work,” said Cathrin Stickney, Parity.org founder and CEO. “The companies on the 2021 list of Best Companies for Women to Advance are shining examples of taking action to help create equal representation, now. We hope more companies will follow their lead and help get women back into the workforce and advance in their careers.”

Companies on the 2021 list share many common best practices that are known to support women, such as work-from-home or telecommute options (97%), flexible working hours (94%), and equal paid family leave for men and women (88%). Nearly every company measures and reports on gender parity to the executive team (97%), and every single company regularly communicates their gender-parity values to employees, encourages men to take their full family leave, and has a zero-tolerance policy for harassment.

For the full Key Findings Report, visit Parity.org.

The full list of Best Companies for Women to Advance 2021, arranged by organizational size, includes:

Large (>5,000 employees)
Adobe
Airbnb 
Atos 
Best Buy
Blue Shield of California
The Clorox Company 
Deutsche Bank 
Fortescue Metals 
Pegasystems 
PepsiCo 
Ralph Lauren Corporation 

Medium (500-4,999 employees)
Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA)
Domo 
Evolent Health 
Guild Education
KeepTruckin
Lucid Software
Momentive (formerly SurveyMonkey) 
Nasdaq
Overstock 
PagerDuty 
Recorded Future, Inc.
Satellite Healthcare

Small (<499 employees)
Aetion
b.well Connected Health
Behavr
CloudInsyte
DaVinci Virtual
Employmetrics
Quil
Real-Time Innovations
Skillz 
United Way of Salt Lake
Very

Companies were rated for their organization’s equality, representation, inclusion, and enablers, or those benefits and policies that help create and sustain equal representation. The Best Companies for Women to Advance list is an initiative of Parity.org, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization focused on bringing gender and racial equality to the highest levels of business.

Organizations wanting to take the ParityPledge or learn more about the Best Companies for Women to Advance List and Parity.org should visit www.Parity.org.

About Parity.org
Parity.org is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization focused on bringing gender and racial equality to the highest levels of business. You can follow Parity.org on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram. Organizations wanting to take the ParityPledge or learn more about Parity.org should visit www.Parity.org.

About the Best Companies for Women to Advance List
Parity.org established the Best Companies for Women to Advance List 2020 to recognize organizations that have benefits, policies, and programs that are particularly beneficial for women to advance in the workplace. After being rated for their organization’s equality, representation, inclusion, and enablers, 34 companies have been named to this year’s List.

Parity.org®, the ParityPledge®, and Best Companies for Women to Advance™ are trademarks of Parity.org.

SOURCE Parity.org

Related Links

https://www.Parity.org

Press Release: Quil Welcomes Gregg Shibata as Vice President of Payor Market Development

PHILADELPHIA — June 15, 2021 — Quil, a health engagement company offering a portfolio of digital-forward engagement solutions, announces the hire of Gregg Shibata as Vice President of Payor Market Development. Gregg brings deep expertise in growing and scaling solutions to serve payors, and will lead the expansion of the company’s strategy to partner with payors nationwide to help members navigate and understand healthcare.

“We are thrilled to welcome Gregg to Quil, as we continue to focus on delivering unique value to our clients in the payor space,” said Carina Edwards, CEO, Quil. “He is a strong leader with a proven track record in understanding the complex needs of health plans, and he will play an integral role in Quil’s journey as the most comprehensive solution on the market to redefine healthcare navigation.”

Prior to joining Quil, Gregg held leadership positions at Echo Health Ventures and Cambia Health Solutions, and was a national consultant supporting Robert Wood Johnson Foundation healthcare initiatives. He has spent his twenty-year career focused on transforming healthcare through innovation and facilitating successful strategic partnerships. Gregg’s relentless outlook to building relationships across silos and diverse stakeholders will help drive Quil’s growth in 2021 and beyond.

“Healthcare is at a critical juncture, with consumer expectations impacting the industry now more than ever, and I am excited to join a skillful and passionate team that is focused on transforming how members access and consume care,” said Gregg Shibata.

About Quil

Quil, the joint venture between Independence Health Group (Independence) and Comcast, is the digital health engagement platform that offers personalized and interactive health journeys to consumers and their caregivers. Quil is committed to educating and engaging consumers and their caregivers about their health as we believe it results in better outcomes at a lower cost. Quil serves patients, members, and their caregivers and is partnered with healthcare providers and health plans nationally. We are headquartered in Philadelphia, PA. Connect with Quil now. Follow Quil on Twitter and on LinkedIn

Communications Contact: Susanna Arntz | Quil 

(P): 973-223-2153 

(E): sarntz@quilhealth.com 

Press Release: Quil Welcomes Gregg Shibata as Vice President of Payor Market Development

PHILADELPHIA — June 15, 2021 — Quil, a health engagement company offering a portfolio of digital-forward engagement solutions, announces the hire of Gregg Shibata as Vice President of Payor Market Development. Gregg brings deep expertise in growing and scaling solutions to serve payors, and will lead the expansion of the company’s strategy to partner with payors nationwide to help members navigate and understand healthcare.

“We are thrilled to welcome Gregg to Quil, as we continue to focus on delivering unique value to our clients in the payor space,” said Carina Edwards, CEO, Quil. “He is a strong leader with a proven track record in understanding the complex needs of health plans, and he will play an integral role in Quil’s journey as the most comprehensive solution on the market to redefine healthcare navigation.”

Prior to joining Quil, Gregg held leadership positions at Echo Health Ventures and Cambia Health Solutions, and was a national consultant supporting Robert Wood Johnson Foundation healthcare initiatives. He has spent his twenty-year career focused on transforming healthcare through innovation and facilitating successful strategic partnerships. Gregg’s relentless outlook to building relationships across silos and diverse stakeholders will help drive Quil’s growth in 2021 and beyond.

“Healthcare is at a critical juncture, with consumer expectations impacting the industry now more than ever, and I am excited to join a skillful and passionate team that is focused on transforming how members access and consume care,” said Gregg Shibata.

About Quil

Quil, the joint venture between Independence Health Group (Independence) and Comcast, is the digital health engagement platform that offers personalized and interactive health journeys to consumers and their caregivers. Quil is committed to educating and engaging consumers and their caregivers about their health as we believe it results in better outcomes at a lower cost. Quil serves patients, members, and their caregivers and is partnered with healthcare providers and health plans nationally. We are headquartered in Philadelphia, PA. Connect with Quil now. Follow Quil on Twitter and on LinkedIn

Communications Contact: Susanna Arntz | Quil 

(P): 973-223-2153 

(E): sarntz@quilhealth.com 

HIStalk Interviews Carina Edwards, CEO, Quil Health

Recently, Carina Edwards, CEO of Quil, sat down with the healthcare technology industry blog, HIStalk to share the latest on market trends, consumer trends, and the future of healthcare. Over the past year, and counting, healthcare has seen some of the biggest shifts in care delivery and innovation we have seen in a long time. In the context of this past year, Carina and HISTalk covered health at home and the future of connected health. Below are some excerpts and key highlights from the interview. Get the full interview on the HISTalk site here.

HIStalk: To what extend has widespread availability of consumer technology, as well as comfort with using it, provided richer healthcare at home options?

Carina: The home as the center of care is squarely in our remit. We purposely think about the connected home, which with devices, wearables, and the television hanging on your wall, can be truly differentiated and activated in health. But the core comes down to, why aren’t consumers activating in their health?

One of the big things for me is that we need to stop, as an industry, thinking about the patient, the member, the employee, and the caregiver. We need to start thinking about the person. We need to be thinking through how we bring health and the navigation of health together for the individual. That means meeting them where they are — whether they are in a high-tech or low-tech household, whether they are connected, how they are connected — and trying to figure out the best way to activate that persona in a healthcare journey or in health literacy.

HIStalk: How will health systems change their business model as the pandemic winds down leaving deeper experience with delivering care outside the hospital?

Carina: Everybody realized that, and they quickly spun up the technologies. It’s an interesting perspective where both providers and payers realized where the gaps were in the other side of the pane of glass. It wasn’t so much, can I get and engage my patient, member, or employee on a digital medium? It’ more like, how does it fit into the workflow of healthcare as we’ve established it? How does that integrate to make sure that the waiting room is virtual? The thoughts are virtual? You’re keeping people engaged, you’re meeting them, and they’re not meeting some random doctor or someone that doesn’t have their health history.

As they look forward, we hear a lot about, how do you bring information sharing? Now that we are all working towards interoperability with the passage of the legislation and the activation of the legislation, how do you bring that to the pane of glass in the provider workflow? In the patient workflow? So they they can not only interact, but they know what to do pre and post, because so much is forgotten during the encounter.

That’s another stat that I love to bring to people’s attention. People forget that when you hear a critical diagnosis or even a joyful diagnosis – congratulations, you’re pregnant, or I’m sorry to inform you that you have cancer — your brain goes to a whole different place. Studies have observed time and time again that patients can’t easily recall information that was relayed during an appointment. So now in this new medium, how do you make sure they understand, acknowledge, and can continue learning and engaging post the video visit?

HIStalk: What expectations come with the big investments that are being made in healthcare companies that offer everything from primary care chains to employee wellness technologies?

Carina: It’s an interesting world and I’m really encouraged by it. You’re going to see a lot of starts and stops, and we’re going to get to new models because consumerism is creeping in. 

The excitement is around consumers and where we’re trying to meet people where they are. We are trying to segment the market. There isn’t one size fits all for an individual, what they need, and their health at a certain part of their life. If I am a younger employee trying to figure out basic care and navigation, things like needing to get a flu shot, that’s a very different patient persona than someone who has been given a new diagnosis, is dealing with a chronic condition, is aging, or needs to go in for a procedure. Care at that point in time becomes very local.

I love that these new models of care are springing up. Just like there’s not one department store we buy clothes in, and there’s not one TV channel that we consume information on, we are giving people opportunities to engage in mediums that might work for them, make it easier in their life, and get all of us to better outcomes. I’m encouraged by it. But I don’t think there’s one big magic bullet that will change healthcare as we know it. At the end of the day, complex care requires care coordination, testing, and all those diagnostic tools that hopefully will move over time into the home. But those towers will still be relevant in someone’s health journey over time.

HIStalk: How do you broaden the use of apps, wearables, or other technologies beyond the “worried well” to more effectively move the health cost needle?

Carina: We spend a lot of time thinking about care in the home — ambient sensing,  wearables, technology, and voice. Together with our parent Comcast, we’ve run a bunch of experiments, especially with the silver tsunami that is coming, the aging at home of a generation that I adore that wants to go out fighting. They do not want to go to assisted living facilities. They want to live exactly where they are and how they want to. We have done a lot of consumer research where those who are aging at home will sometimes buy some of these technologies to allow them to continue to live independently. The other thing that we see is that there are 54 million unpaid caregivers in the US, those unpaid caregivers are also managing their own lives, and 23% of them have worse health because of their caregiving responsibilities.

Finding technologies to support the care recipient and being mindful of the individual that wants that independence, but also wants that safety net, is a great segment where you will see consumerism come to life for aging and home solutions that are way better than the “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up” button. That’s where you are going to see some really fun innovation.

Some people dumb down hospital at home and remote monitoring to “can get a pulse ox into the chart?” That’s not the challenging part. It’s the figuring out what data to get, what ranges to allow, and how to make sure that when it comes into the clinical record that it’s clinically relevant. How do you start thinking through the lens of the clinicians at that point in time to say, what is useful in an encounter? What is useful for me to remote monitor? When do I actually look at thresholds, alerts, and alarms?

That remote patient monitoring world will continue to scale from simple wearables to ambient sensors. We have been playing with this concept of, can you make the bathmat a scale? Can you start using new technologies for those that are very chronically ill, that might have episodes that they might not be self-aware enough to tackle?

HIStalk: A new article just concluded that nurses spend twice as much time managing a patient who is seen virtually instead of in the office, mostly because they need to monitor a steady stream of data from wearables and patient-reported information instead of just looking everything over during a three-month office visit. Has the capability of sensors exceeded the ability of people or systems to monitor the data those sensors create?

Carina: It’s a workflow and insight challenge. When you start looking at data, data is data. Data is overwhelming. You can start gleaning insight from data through models, algorithms, and deep understanding, but you have to do so through the lens not just of the data and the individual generating it, but the individual who has to consume the data. We spend a lot of time on user experience and user design, and sitting with clinicians – which has been challenging during the pandemic – to observe their workflow, watch these things, and design the system around when it should alert, when it  should tell you, what’s overwhelming, what can be computer screened out, and what can be noise in the system. Then, what is actionable, and where does that action lie?

When we redesigned these versions, the process side of it, we try to throw tech at a lot of things. The process and understanding side is important. Then, there’s the financial component. Is the nurse doing some of those things because that is the right data digestion, or is it also because there is a documentation requirement to get reimbursed for remote patient monitoring? Thinking about that whole spectrum and making it a win-win for all three parties involved is key. The payer truly comes into this as well. It’s a new frontier that can only be better. When we start any new technology, it changes. When it moves the cheese, it changes the workflow, and so many times we don’t assess the workflow change and acknowledge it.

HIStalk: With all of the provider roles, who coordinates monitoring the patient’s data that is created by devices in the home?

Carina: The key for us is today, where we are. This is all a life cycle, and as we are progressing down our life cycle. We see convergence coming together for the individual. That’s our three- to five-year vision of how I, as an individual, get the different streams of health, care, benefits, and employee benefits all navigated for me in one pane of glass that I choose. We’re starting in the provider, payer, and employer world, with unique use cases. Learning and aggregating, and where we can collapse them, we do. If I am on a pregnancy journey that is navigating me — not just on benefits, short-term disability, talking to my manager about being pregnant, and thinking about childcare post delivery — and I am also on a pregnancy journey with my provider, those two worlds come together for me today on a pane of glass.

But each of those pieces is uniquely owned by the organization. The employee benefit side of it is going back to the employer. The clinical insight generator is going over to the provider. But the individual has one pane of glass to see the experience together. That is the nirvana as we think through data sharing, permissioning, and where all of that needs to go. And to your point, who is bearing risk on that? How do I make sure that the risk-bearing entity — because there’s many models of risk now — that you need to align around that model of who’s there in it with you, that everybody wants the best outcome? Then, who is incented for better outcomes?

HIStalk: How can technology support unpaid caregivers of people aging at home?

Carina: I look at it pretty simply. It’s there for them and it’s there for you. For them, it’s technology that is easing the care recipient’s mind. For you, it’s also there for the caregiver. They are able to do task trade-offs with their family, coordinate things, be in one space, not have to time slice, and have one point of view on what’s going on with mom, dad, loved one, neighbor, etc. There’s also levels of caregiving. The fun thing is there for them, there for you. As the care recipient, there for me, I want to know who has access to my data, who I want to have permission to my data. 

We think a lot about the tier of caregiver you are. If you are the neighbor who might have a key to get somebody in if something happens to you, that’s a tier one relationship. If you’re navigating and supporting me for a geriatric hip fracture to home, or through hospice to home, you want that person to have access to everything. Making sure that the tool understands that it’s not one way. It’s not a caregiver tool, it’s the caregiver and the care recipient tool. I’ll leave it with there with there for them and there for you, because it’s multi-sided.